People have been getting high on substances for thousands of years. Our species just likes escaping reality at least for a few hours. But can dogs get high?

After all, they’re our best friends and the first living organism we ever domesticated. We’re used to having them around. So, of course, some people would want to share weed with their pets. But is it a good idea?

Spoiler alert — nope, it’s not. Still, let’s see why. 

Marijuana and Dogs

A stoned dog might look funny, but it’s definitely not a good idea. Like humans, dogs can get high if they’re exposed to weed. Sadly, the effects cannabis has on us aren’t the same as on our fluffy friends.

Marijuana contains delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) — the cannabinoid that gives pot its characteristic psychoactive effects. While we can tolerate THC, for dogs, it’s toxic. It can give them some pretty nasty side effects and even death. If you don’t know how much THC is safe for dogs, better not risk it.

So can animals get high? Definitely. But is it ok? Definitely not. Don’t give weed to your dogs — it can kill them.

Can a Dog Get High From Second-Hand Smoke?

Second-hand smoking is the inhaling of the smoke exhaled from the smoker. People can get high second-hand, and so can dogs. It depends on several factors we’ll discuss later, but getting your dog high by letting it in the same room while you smoke is possible and not recommended.

We’re not here to tell you not to smoke weed. But make sure your pup isn’t in the same enclosed space while you’re getting higher than the Empire State.

How to Tell if Your Dog is High?

Mistakes happen sometimes. Your dog might find your secret stash and eat it. While this sounds like a funny story, it can cause your pooch immense problems. Always make sure to keep your pot in a place where your dog cannot reach it.

So you already have the answer to the question, “Do dogs get high?” It’s time to discuss what happens after that. Weed is toxic to dogs and comes with many side effects.

Low Blood Pressure

The THC in marijuana can lower your dog’s blood pressure. It happens because the cannabinoid relaxes the blood vessels and allows the blood to travel more easily. So, dogs high on weed can experience symptoms accompanying low blood pressure, like dizziness or fatigue.

That’s one of the side effects of CBD oil in dogs, too. So always be careful with giving your pup any cannabinoids.

Urinary Retention

Do animals get high in nature? Interestingly, yes, some do. Humans have spotted bees, bats, and Bighorn sheep acting weirdly, drunk on fermented fruit, or high on rare species of lichen.

But what happens to dogs if they get high? One side effect of getting your pet high is urinary retention, or the inability of the bladder to get entirely emptied. It can result in the inability to pee, pain, and bloating.

Lack of Coordination 

So can dogs get contact high? Yes, they can. But it’s more important to discuss the effects of such an experience.

When your puppy gets high, it’ll probably lose some of its motor control and start acting like a Scottish lass exiting a pub. Also, puking is usually included, to complete the picture.

Anxious and Easily Stressed Out

If you’re reading this and wondering how to get a dog stoned, please, hear us out. Don’t get your dog high on purpose.

Weed can make your puppy highly anxious and reactive. As the feeling would be new to it, it would be scared, stressed, and confused. Plus, lacking motor control and feeling nauseous won’t make things better. 

Lethargy

Can dogs get high from eating weed? Definitely.

Eating weed can be way more dangerous than inhaling its smoke. It can seriously endanger your dog. So if you suspect your pet has eaten some from your stash, call the vet immediately.

One of the many King Kanine CBD reviews online (a great CBD company for dogs) mentioned their dog was feeling incredibly sleepy after its first CBD dose. It’s a common effect between CBD and THC. But with THC, lethargy can be the first step to a way more serious condition, like a coma.

dog yawning

Vomiting

So, can dogs get high? Yes, but at what cost.

Vomiting is among the most frequent THC side effects in dogs. No matter how funny and entertaining the dog’s drunken walk looked in the beginning, when your puppy starts puking on your mom’s favorite carpet, you’ll quickly change your mind.

But one positive about this side effect is that if your pup vomits, it might remove at least some part of the weed from its body.

Seizures/Tremors

Another common side effect of marijuana in dogs is seizures. And while CBD is known to decrease the occurrence of epileptic seizures, it seems like THC can induce them.

So again — can dogs get high from weed? Yes, but it’s definitely not worth risking your pooch’s health for entertainment.

Can Your Dog Die from Marijuana?

What happens if a dog gets high? You should immediately seek your vet’s attention and tell them exactly what happened and how much weed your dog ingested.

THC poisoning can be fatal for dogs.

The probability of your pup dying from marijuana is moderate to high and depends on three factors:

  • Your dog’s health — If your puppy has preexisting conditions, its chances of surviving a high decrease significantly.
  • Dog size — Smaller breeds are more likely to suffer a fatal THC intoxication. 
  • Dosage — Higher doses come with higher risk, but even small ones can induce unpleasant side effects in your puppy.

What Do I Do If My Dog Accidentally Gets High?

Your dog can get high accidentally after finding your pot and eating it. So what to do if you come home and see your pooch feeling unwell?

First of all, call your vet. No matter how little your pup might have consumed, taking it to the vet’s office is the best option. And in case you’re wondering, you should definitely tell the vet about the weed — knowing what they’re dealing with will increase the chance of saving your pup.

So if a friend ever asks you, “Can dogs get high?” you know the answer. 

Here’s what to expect when you go to the vet with such a problem:

  • Fluid therapy — The vet might administer fluids intravenously to promote more rapid recovery.
  • Induced vomiting — They’ll probably try to make your pup throw up so it can “cleanse” itself from the THC.
  • Keep your pet warm — THC might interfere with your pup’s ability to maintain its body temperature. That can end with hypothermia, so make sure to keep your doggy warm.
  • Activated charcoal — It can decrease the THC absorption as it binds to its molecules in the gut.
dog rolling on its back in the grass

How Long Will My Dog Be High?

It mainly depends on the dose it took. Overall, cleaning the THC from your pet’s body might take from a few hours to a few days. That’s because THC is stored in the fat cells, which slows down its release. 

Getting Dogs High for Fun

Is it bad to get your dog high? If you’ve reached this point of the article and still don’t know the answer to this question, you might want to reread it.

Getting your pet high on purpose, for fun, for making a video, or for whatever other reason is not ok. It’s animal abuse, and you shouldn’t do it.

How About CBD for Dogs?

CBD is another cannabinoid in cannabis. But it’s very different from THC. It won’t make your pet high, and it’s not toxic.

CBD has been found beneficial for people and dogs. It decreases anxiety, promotes calmness, and can even benefit dogs with arthritis. Also, you’ll find it in many pet-friendly forms — some of the best CBD treats for dogs, oils, topicals, and even CBD-infused peanut butter.

Wrap Up

Looking at a stoned dog might be funny at first — you’ll see it wobbling around, looking confused. But you should know that getting your dog high on weed can kill your furry best friend.

THC is highly toxic to dogs. While we can tolerate it at specific doses, it comes with many severe side effects in dogs. Vomiting, low blood pressure, seizures, and even coma and death are possible if you give your dog marijuana.So can dogs get high? Yes, they can. But you should never make them high on purpose. Always make sure to hide your pot well before leaving the house to prevent your pup from finding it.

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Miglena loves spending time with friends and talking about science over a glass of wine. Born and raised in a small town, she’s always been surrounded by animals. Cats, dogs, chickens, cows, and goats have all been her companions from an early age. Her passion for the animal kingdom became even stronger after she went to study microbiology in Scotland. Miglena’s love for writing, combined with her curiosity, makes her a valuable member of the pawsome advice team.